Quillwork with Jennine Krauchi

  • Application Deadline
    Tuesday, May 17, 2022 at 11:59pm
  • Saturday, May 28–Sunday, May 29, 2022
  • 10:00am – 4:00pm
  • Manitoba Museum, 190 Rupert Avenue

Spaces are limited. We may not be able to accommodate everyone who applies.


Traditional practices have origins that are spiritual and material, and many have histories that are thousands of years old. Quillwork is no exception. This workshop will respectfully explore this challenging practice that long predates contact.

It will be held over two days because preparing, dying and working with quills is very time-intensive and requires patience. It is intended for Indigenous artists and others who will carry this culturally significant skill forward and help to ensure its survival by applying it in a contemporary art context. As part of the workshop, participants will have access to the Manitoba Museum collection of historical quillwork, guided by Dr. Maureen Matthews.

Jennine Krauchi is a Métis beadwork artist and designer who has taught beading, quillwork and moccasin/mukluk-making in schools and at festivals in Canada and Europe. She will be assisted in the workshop by Cynthia Boehm, David Heinrichs and Mona Moquin.

To apply for this workshop, please send one paragraph describing why you would like to participate to Adriana at programs@mawa.ca by Tuesday, May 17 at midnight with “Quillwork” in the subject line. Successful applicants will be charged $50. If finances are a barrier, please contact MAWA staff.

Please bring your lunch and a smock/paint shirt.

Note that the Manitoba Museum will be enforcing public health rules in place at that time.

For Indigenous artists, practising artists and mentor/teachers. Application deadline: Tuesday, May 17. Successful applicants will be charged $50. If finances are a barrier, please contact MAWA staff.

  • Headshot of Jennine Krauchi

    Jennine Krauchi is a Métis beadwork artist and designer. Her clothing and replica work is in the collections of the Manitoba Museum, Parks Canada, the Canadian Museum of History, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights, and institutions in
    Scotland, France and the US. She has spent much of her career sharing traditional practices to foster their survival through contemporary applications.